Categories
Art History English History Open Library

UCD Humanities Institute Soundcloud

The Humanities Institute’s podcast series features more than 200 recorded lectures, papers, interviews and presentations that have taken place in, or have been supported directly by the UCD Humanities Institute. Since the launch of the series in late 2010 there have been over 120,000 downloads of our podcasts and the series continues to attract listeners from around the world. The podcasts are recorded and managed by Real Smart Media.

The best way to receive the latest Humanities Institute podcasts is to subscribe to our series on iTunes or become a follower of our Soundcloud page. All podcasts from the series are available to stream on the playlist below. The complete list of our podcasts is available here.

https://www.ucd.ie/humanities/events/podcasts/

Level: All

Categories
History

Visualizing Abolition: A Digital History of the Suppression of the African Slave Trade

Visualizing Abolition maps the suppression of the African slave trade by tracing nearly 31,000 records of correspondence exchanged between the British Foreign Office and British commissioners, ministers, naval officers, and representatives of foreign governments around the world over the course of the nineteenth century. It provides users with three resources. First, a database that lists the names of the senders, recipients, places of origin and destination, dates, as well as the subject of the letters when available. Second, essays exploring different topics related to the suppression of the traffic. Finally, a gallery of images that provides visual context for the information available on the website. These resources allow students and researchers to further understand the history of the suppression of the African slave trade and expand our knowledge of the largest coerced migration in history.

http://visualizingabolition.org

Level: All

Categories
Art History Open Library

Open GLAM (Galleries, Libraries, Archives, Museums)

The OpenGLAM initiative is currently working on a modern set of principles and values on Open Access for Cultural Heritage. We expect to draft a Declaration that outlines the rationales behind open access policy adoptions, acknowledges different cultural backgrounds, and addresses ethical and privacy considerations to help promote the adoption of open policies by a broader set of organizations around the world.

https://medium.com/open-glam

Level: All

Categories
Art History Open Library

MCN: Advancing Digital Transformation in Museums

The Ultimate Guide to Virtual Museum Resources, E-Learning, and Online Collections. Access to endless open content. Educational resources for e-learning. Virtual retreats to art, culture, and history around the globe.

Every resource is free to access and enjoy. Much of it, though not all, is also open content, in the sense that it’s freely reusable and re-mixable under Creative Commons licensing. Open content is clearly labeled on its respective website.

https://mcn.edu/a-guide-to-virtual-museum-resources/

Level: All

Categories
History

African-American History Resources at National Archives

The Archives holds a wealth of material documenting the African American experience, and highlights these resources online, in programs, and through traditional and social media.

https://www.archives.gov/research/african-americans#toc-resources-for-african-american-researchcontact-us

Level: All

Categories
English History

RECIRC: The Reception and Circulation of Early Modern Women’s Writing 1550 – 1700

RECIRC: The Reception and Circulation of Early Modern Women’s Writing 1550 – 1700 is a research project about the impact made by women writers and their works in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Led by Marie-Louise Coolahan, and funded by the European Research Council from 2014 to 2020, the project involved a team of 11 researchers based at the National University of Ireland Galway. The focus included writers who were read in Ireland and Britain as well as women born and resident in Anglophone countries. Therefore, the subject of study was not limited to authors who wrote in English. RECIRC aimed to produce a large-scale, quantitative analysis of the reception and circulation of women’s writing from 1550 to 1700. The RECIRC database is one of its major outputs.

https://recirc.nuigalway.ie/

Level: All

Categories
Art History History

The Media History Digital Library

The Media History Digital Library is a non-profit initiative, led by Eric Hoyt at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, dedicated to digitizing historic books and magazines about film, broadcasting, and recorded sound for broad public access.We scan works that are no longer protected by copyright or that have been licensed to us to share with you. The project is supported by libraries and collectors of materials who loan them for scanning, and sponsors who contribute funds to cover the cost of scanning. The redesign of this website was enabled thanks to a generous grant from the Mary Pickford Foundation. More of our sponsors and partners are acknowledged below.

http://mediahistoryproject.org

Level: All

Categories
Computer Science Information Studies Open Library

Oxford Text Archive

Oxford Text Archive is a repository of full-text literary and linguistic resources. Thousands of texts in more than 25 languages.

The Oxford Text Archive (OTA) provides repository services for literary and linguistic datasets. In that role the OTA collects, catalogues, preserves and distributes high-quality digital resources for research and teaching. We currently hold thousands of texts in more than 25 languages, and are actively working to extend our catalogue of holdings. The OTA relies upon deposits from the wider community as the primary source of materials. The OTA is part of the CLARIN European Research Infrastructure; it is registered as a CLARIN centre, and OTA services are part of the University of Oxford’s contribution to the CLARIN-UK Consortium.

https://ota.bodleian.ox.ac.uk/repository/xmlui/

Level: All

Categories
English Information Studies Open Library

THE PULTER PROJECT: A Poet in the Making

This digital collaboration aims at allowing readers to engage with multiple, different representations and readings of Hester Pulter’s striking verse. The distinctive nature of the project is that it does not adopt an editorial process that strives to establish a single, ideal edited form for these works, but instead endorses multiple, equally authorized versions as a way to foreground the complexity of Pulter’s poetics and the affordances of scholarly editing in the digital age.

The Pulter Project seeks to pull back the editorial curtain to reveal to readers the often invisible decisions underwriting the making of poetry and poets. At the core of our site is a tool, powered by the Versioning Machine, featuring side-by-side versions of each poem. These versions include:high-resolution, zoomable photographic facsimiles of manuscript pages; transcriptions of the poems that capture changes by the main scribe, Pulter (probably), and the manuscript’s first readers; elemental editions: deliberately pared-down modernizations with minimal notes; amplified editions: commissioned from experts to foreground different aspects of Pulter’s verse.

http://pulterproject.northwestern.edu/about-the-project.html

Level: All

Categories
English History

Colored Conventions Project

The Colored Conventions Project (CCP) is a scholarly and community research project dedicated to bringing the seven decades-long history of nineteenth-century Black organizing to digital life. Mirroring the collective nature of the nineteenth-century Colored Conventions, CCP uses innovative, inclusive models and partnerships to locate, transcribe, and archive the documentary record related to this nearly forgotten history and to curate digital exhibits that highlight its stories, events and themes.

Founded in a graduate class at the University of Delaware, the CCP brings together interdisciplinary scholars and students, librarians and independent researchers, national teaching partners and media specialists, academic institutions, and members of the public. More than 2,500 people—scholars and teachers around the country, undergraduates, and members of the public—have contributed their time and energy to our ongoing, online effort of transcribing convention minutes and creating digital exhibits. Supported by prestigious grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Mellon Foundation, CCP is excited to continue expanding its nationwide collaborations in teaching, learning, and celebrating the history of Black organizing.

https://coloredconventions.org/

Level: All