Categories
Architecture Art History English History Information Studies

Projects at Price Lab

As the centerpiece of the School of Arts and Sciences strategic initiative Humanities in the Digital Age, the Price Lab supports innovative uses of technology in the study of history, art, and culture. We work in close partnership with the Penn Libraries and Penn Museum of Archeology and Anthropology to help train faculty and students in the latest digital tools and methods, encourage development of new computing-intensive humanities courses, and promote collaborative faculty-student experiments and research projects.

Established in 2015 with a $7 million gift from Michael and Vikki Price, the Lab is located alongside the Wolf Humanities Center on the 6th floor of Williams Hall. The Price Lab serves as a central node of communication and exchange across Penn’s many departments, centers, and schools with expertise and interest in the digital humanities. We are rapidly expanding our capacity through the hiring of new faculty and technical staff and, with the support of a four-year, $2 million grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, are launching an array of fellowship programs.

https://pricelab.sas.upenn.edu/projects

Level: Researcher

Categories
Architecture History

Irish Historical Towns Atlas Online

Traditionally Irish Historic Towns Atlases (IHTA) have been available in printed format only, with CD-ROMs included from no. 19 (Dublin, part II, 1610 to 1756). Digital editions of selected atlases are now available to explore online, free of charge.

https://www.ria.ie/irish-historic-towns-atlas-online

Level: All

Categories
Architecture Computer Science English History Information Studies Open Library

Locating London’s Past

This website allows you to search a wide body of digital resources relating to early modern and eighteenth-century London, and to map the results on to a fully GIS compliant version of John Rocque’s 1746 map.

https://www.locatinglondon.org/

Level: All

Categories
Architecture Computer Science English History Information Studies

UCD Industrial Memories Project

Industrial Memories – a UCD digital humanities witnessing project – takes a closer look at Ireland’s legacy of institutional child abuse to reveal new and important findings.

https://industrialmemories.ucd.ie/

Level: All

Categories
Architecture Art History History

Making Victorian Dublin

Making Victorian Dublin is an exciting and innovative collaborative project between geologists and architectural historians at Trinity College Dublin which has revealed the building industry responsible for Ireland’s Victorian architecture. Funded by the Irish Research Council, the project aims to open new interdisciplinary horizons for the research of Ireland’s past. For too long the craftsmen and quarrymen who cut, carved and constructed splendid buildings in Ireland’s towns, cities and countryside have been lost to history, overshadowed by the architects and patrons who designed and commissioned them. But without the marble masons, stone cutters, carvers and builders these richly coloured and impeccably detailed buildings simply could not have been achieved.

Focused on Ireland’s most significant and influential building of the period, the Museum Building of Trinity College Dublin, researchers have uncovered the remarkable network of quarries, craft communities and transport routes which enabled its construction. A few strides within this building displays the full range of Ireland’s remarkable stone resources. The Museum Building pioneered the patriotic use of native coloured stone and established a taste for Connemara marble and Cork Red limestone which spread across Ireland to Britain and the United States. Connemara marble with its distinctive green and white colour banding would become emblematic of Irish identity.

Level: All

Categories
Architecture Art History English History Information Studies

HESTIA

Sometime in the middle of the fifth-century BC, Herodotus, a Greek living on the coast of Asia Minor in a town called Halicarnassus (modern-day Bodrum, Turkey) set out to explain the origins of the Great War that had taken place a generation before between his peoples, the Greeks, and the Persians. The result is his Histories (history means literally an ‘enquiry’ in the Greek), in which he explores the world of his time, the conflicts that had given rise to it, the noteworthy deeds of various kinds of people in it, and the towns and cities that had risen and fallen throughout it. For Herodotus ‘goes through in detail towns of men both small and great alike: for of the places that were once great, most have now become small, while those that were great in my time were small before’ (1.5): the idea that space moves is fundamental to Herodotus, as he uses the new medium of his age—writing—to represent the world around him.

The Hestia project takes up Herodotus’s enquiry through the new medium of our time, digital technology, and involves a collaborative team of researchers from Classical Studies, Geography and Digital Humanities. Using a digital text of Herodotus’s Histories, from which we have extracted all place-names, we use web-mapping technologies such as GIS, Google Earth and Narrative TimeMap to investigate the cultural geography of the ancient world through the eyes of one of its first witnesses. Our aims are twofold. First, we depart from the traditional cartographic idea of geographic spaces as points on a map, by using the digital medium to read text and space alongside each other, thereby allowing a sense of space as something lived and experienced to emerge. In particular, we construct network maps of the relations between places in Herodotus in ways that challenge the schematic division of the world as a clash between East and West, between Asia and Europe. Second, we enable users of different expertise and interests—researchers, students and general enthusiasts—to use our technologies for themselves.

https://hestia.open.ac.uk/hestia/

Level: All

Categories
Architecture Art History English History Information Studies Open Library

Mina Loy: Navigating the Avant Garde

Artist, poet, feminist, entrepreneur, inventor, and world traveler, Mina Loy consorted with nearly every avant-garde movement, including Futurism, Dada, and Surrealism, but was contained by none. Mina Loy: Navigating the Avant-Garde documents her avant-garde affiliations, pursuing new modes of textual and visual expression in order to invite a closer, more informed engagement with her work. This peer-reviewed, digital, multimedia scholarly book is an open educational resource authored by students, staff, and faculty at Davidson College, Duquesne University, and the University of Georgia (UGA). It is the culmination of a five-year collaboration, supported by a generous Digital Humanities Advancement Grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

https://mina-loy.com

Level: All